Tuesday, March 06, 2007

How to Make a Proper Fluffanutter


Pay close attention. This is a New England classic, and can sometimes be hard to master. I have been doing it for a good 15 years or so, so maybe I can teach you amies something.
Have everything you need handy. Bread, peanut butter, fluff, and a good butterknife.
Use the butterknife to scoop out a good amount of peanut butter. (It is important to do peanut butter first so that the fluff has swirls of peanut butter in it rather than the peanut butter having swirls of fluff - that's just grody.) Spread the peanut butter over the first peace of bread until it reaches the inside edges of the crust.

Repeat the first step - you know, the one with the peanut butter - using fluff. It is encouraged that a larger quantity of fluff be used. Fluff, being entirely made of sugar, has a lighter taste than peanut butter, and you need quite a bit to equalize the tastes. Also, using more fluff will help to keep the bread from tearing, and no one likes torn bread.




Oh no! Fluff is all over my knife! Whatever will I do?! Well folks, there's only one thing to do ...







Of course, why would anyone think differently?!


Ahhh yes, the beauty of it all!
(Take that Lindsey!)





12 comments:

ML said...

Great job on the fluffernutter! Might I add that according to Levi the ultimate sandwich is a fluffernutter with raspberry jam. I also want to add that your choice of smooth Jiff peanutbutter was good as well as white bread--a classic fluffernutter must have white bread. And you're so right Mal, not enough fluff will tear the bread and show that you're a real amateur. Dad

kyledawn said...

awww, i'm sad that not all the pictures worked...

Mallory said...

Actually, it's crunchy peanut butter. I've never really been into the smooth, although I know that most people preferr it. Jiff is really the only way to go though, this is true.

Kule! I'm sorry they didn't work. Try again later though! 'Cause they're yummy looking, and fluff always reminds me of Colin now.

ave said...

You are so gorgeous. Just thought I'd let you know.

ML said...

That first comment shows you how close he looked at the photos--smooth Jiff and white bread??? Ah well, he was just too dazzled by his daughter!

Mallory said...

Well, it is white bread.

Mallory said...

Oh, and thanks Ave. You're too sweet. Oh! I got my hair cut again. I'll put pics up soon.

kyledawn said...

yeah, i can totally see the pictures now! yay! i'm glad you have instructed me on the proper procedure of fluffernutter creation. i think i tried one for the first time this summer and was pleasantly surprised. who knew i would like something so sticky!

mal, why does fluff remind you of colin? i'll be sure to tell him that when i see him this coming week...

Mallory said...

You're going to go see him?! In Italy!? No way! I'm so excited for you! It reminds me of Colin because he was the first person I met who lived outside Maine that knew what Fluff was.

Calandria said...

Well done, Mal and ML. Very well done. I congratulate you on these most artistic food pics celebrating our Maine heritage.

kyledawn said...

dude, i totally knew what fluff was ever since i was in elementary school. my mom always made fudge with it. you're so silly for never asking me.

colin says hi!

Auntie Lee said...

The Dutch make a big deal about how Americans make peanut butter and jam sandwiches. They think it is gross. Paris is the only kid in his school who will consume such a concoction. You can't buy jelly and fluffernutter is almost $10- a jar so we don't get that often (only on a B-day or something).
I like the series of pics. Very documentary like.